kuwux

Reza Aditya Aditya itibaren Jandab, Qom, İran itibaren Jandab, Qom, İran

Okuyucu Reza Aditya Aditya itibaren Jandab, Qom, İran

Reza Aditya Aditya itibaren Jandab, Qom, İran

kuwux

This is one of the best bio books i've come across. It is responsible for my thinking books were good and worth exploring. Bob Zmuda was Kaufman's best friend and writing partner and this books gives the reader an inside look at one of the most interesting people we had the pleasure of knowing in the 20th century.

kuwux

This was an interesting book for me, because I identified on many levels with the narrator, who is 32 (check), redheaded (I pretend), and an anthropology student on a bit of hiatus from her research (I started out in ethnomusicology, which is a branch of it). So even though the author is a middle-aged man, it is interesting to see his take on what a woman of that place in life would think/do. I liked seeing a woman who wasn't trivial, was a thinker, maybe even an overthinker, which to me was spot on. There are intellectual women out there, you know. The funny thing is, and maybe Rush meant it this way, I think it is easy to tell that the love story isn't going to work out. She approaches it intentionally, almost as an experiment, because she is drawn to Nelson Denoon. I think it isn't really a physical or emotional connection as much as she falls for his brain. And she tries to make it work, but really she isn't a relationship type any more than he is. I love the crazed self-analysis about childbearing, and how that suggestion on his part in the end is what makes her leave. (Calculation on his part? I can hardly think of Nelson as clueless, although he wasn't great at picking up on social/interpersonal cues in Tsau either). The novel ends with her back in America, benefiting from her time and experience with Doonan, but seemingly relieved that she escaped the life they would have had together. You get the sense that it was an episode in her life and he might never escape it, and I felt relieved for her too! A lot of reviewers, even John Updike back in the day, took issue with his vocabulary usage, but I really liked it. I found this to be true to the elevated thought required of professionals in certain fields, who are surrounded by an expectation of constant noetic expression. "One attractive thing about me is that I'm never bored, because during any caesuras my personal automatic pastime of questioning my own motives is there for me." "It would be about as hard to read me as being in the kitchen and noticing when the compressor went on in the refrigerator." "I had to realize that the male idea of successful love is to get a woman into a state of secure dependency which the male can renew by a touch or pat or gesture now and then while he reserves his major attention for his work in the world.... Equilibrium or perfect mating will come when the male is convinced he is giving less than he feels is really required to maintain dependency and the woman feels she is getting more from him than her servile displays should merit." "The main effort of arranging your life should be to progressively reduce the amount of time required to decently maintain yourself so that you can have all the time you want for reading." "Keeping permanent intimate comedy going is more important than any other thing." "I was emotional a lot, privately. I wanted to incorporate everything, understand everything, because time is cruel and nothing stays the same." "Religion might originate through thunder and lightning and wondering what the stars are, but once it gets rolling it's about self-hatred."

kuwux

It took me 5 months to finish this book and it was TOTALLY worth it. This is a piece of art, although I admit that at times it was tiring and boring, specially in the middle with so many different characters. It takes you a while to get accustomed to who is who and what's going on. In the last quarter of the book, things start to clear up and it gets very exciting again.