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Su San San itibaren Pedapadu, Andhra Pradesh 532401, Hindistan itibaren Pedapadu, Andhra Pradesh 532401, Hindistan

Okuyucu Su San San itibaren Pedapadu, Andhra Pradesh 532401, Hindistan

Su San San itibaren Pedapadu, Andhra Pradesh 532401, Hindistan

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I had trouble reading this book. I usually sink my teeth into books that I like. This one I wrestled with. I kept comparing it to Sue Harrison's Mother Earth, Father Sky series which I ripped through. The comparisons I made were in the following way: writing style was dry, sometimes the dialog was unbelievable, it was too long and sometimes I got lost if I put the book down for a week and tried to pick it up again. It did contain good elements like: historical native american ideas and the "dreamer" concept was wonderful. I didn't feel for the characters as much as Sue Harrison's, however, the heroine in the story was the most outstanding and I do like the fact that she didn't get her man in the end---so props to the writers for being unconventional. I chock up my slight dissatisfaction to the fact that this is the first book in their series. I have picked up People of the Weeping Eye in hopes that the writing got better---at least I know I can trust the plot to be interesting and, at best, get some historical knowledge of native americans out of it.

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Rivers of London (or Midnight Riot as it's known in the US) is the first of a projected trilogy in the urban fantasy genre. At first glance, I thought this may be a case of ‘Harry Dresden does London’, but I was wrong. Although there are similarities this book has a completely different feel. It’s not quite as dark as the Dresden books, and it’s obvious right from the beginning that this book was not written from the perspective of an experienced supernatural detective. One thing you can be sure of, it’s definitely a British book, which for me (as a Brit) makes a refreshing change in this genre. The main character, Peter Grant, is a rookie British Bobby / wizard’s apprentice, working in a sort of secret department of the metropolitan police (which consists of one man, Nightingale). Sounds an unlikely mix and I must admit I was dubious before I began reading, but the humour, which consists of lots of sarcasm and self-deprecation (I did say it was a British book!) really makes it work. Every character was well presented and interesting (even the incidental characters) which is quite an achievement in this genre. Characterisation is an important part of any writing and one that many authors in urban fantasy overlook beyond the central characters I feel. So it was nice to have some added depths in the portrayal of a wide ranging cast of personalities. Overall I thought it was very well written, lots of fun and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I’m definitely left wanting more, and am looking forward to when the next book is published (around April I think).

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While not definitive or considered scholarly, this is one of the best written and smartest analyses of the Jack the Ripper (hi)story and definitely the best overview of the building of the JTR mythology (Dance of the Gull-Catchers, the final epilogue/issue). Like all things by Alan Moore, it's well worth your time, even if you don't usually like graphic novels.