velbez

Anton VelBez VelBez itibaren Saint Paul, NE 68873, Birleşik Devletler itibaren Saint Paul, NE 68873, Birleşik Devletler

Okuyucu Anton VelBez VelBez itibaren Saint Paul, NE 68873, Birleşik Devletler

Anton VelBez VelBez itibaren Saint Paul, NE 68873, Birleşik Devletler

velbez

I must be retarded for not getting this book. I didn't enjoy it in the least. The Holocaust theme was interesting, but the moving about in time, etc. No thanks.

velbez

Unwind, by Neal Shusterman, is a captivating, action-packed science fiction novel. Although I generally avoid science fiction, a close friend highly recommended this book, so I gave it a chance. At once, I was immersed in the story. Unwind follows the story of three teenagers who, although coming from distinctively different backgrounds, faces a life-threatening situation that forces them to rely on one another. The society in which they are born into is one in which human life, specifically those of teens, is merely a matter of numbers. Unwanted children are salvaged for their body parts in order for more fortunate members of society to benefit. Once the papers are signed, there is no going back. Connor, a mere boy of sixteen, has his life signed away by his parents due to his delinquent behavior. Not willing to be “unwound” before his life even begins, Connor flees from home. Found by the cops on his second day on the run, Connor causes a traffic accident as he takes a hostage in order to ensure his escape. The hostage is Lev, a boy on his way to be unwound, the day after his thirteenth birthday, as his religion dictates. Using the highway accident as a distraction, Risa escape her own fate: as a ward of the state, Risa becomes and unwind in order to cut orphanage costs. These three teens are forced to work together over their distrust in order to assure their survival, fighting against the accepted injustices of society. The central conflict of Unwind is man versus society. The theme depicted in this novel follows this conflict, showing that human beings escape their own cruelty by justifying their actions. Although being unwound is a procedure in which every organ and body part of the participant is surgically removed and displaced to another being, the general mass intellectualizes the program by stating that those who are unwound do not die, but are instead merely broken off into parts. In this way, they say, those who have lived bad lives are able to redeem themselves in another person’s body. Unwinding is not an act of murder, but that of giving appreciation of life to those who have wasted away their own. Many people benefit from the parts of the unwound, but those who are giving up their entire being have no say in the matter. It is forceful donation, and each day more and more kids are being unwound, and with each operation more and more people are becoming desensitized to the morality of the situation. It is a race against time, for as each day passes, another teen dies, and another adult looks away. One symbol found in this novel is the storked babies. Another legislation passed by the government involving unwanted kids is the “stork program.” Mothers of unwanted pregnancies are able to legally leave their newborn babies on the doorsteps of strangers and walk away. These babies are symbols of the irresponsibility and coldness of humankind. After the program is implemented, infants immediately begin appearing on the steps of houses. Women are able to carelessly leave their own child with a complete stranger and return back to their own lives. Protected sex no longer becomes an issue, and respect for one’s body becomes nonexistent. However, despite the naive belief of the mother who drops off her child, there is no assurance that the baby will be taken care of. Connor tells the story of a storked baby that appeared in his neighborhood. The families, tired of taking in another mouth to feed, passed the child from doorstep to doorstep, until the infant made a complete circle of the block and landed once again on Connor’s doorstep. By the time the baby reaches his household, it looks half-starved, its skin a disturbingly blue hue. The baby dies before even reaching the hospital. The mother is wrong for abandoning her child, the people are wrong for not taking it in. Unwind is told by four different narrators. Connor, Lev, and Risa each have their own story, providing readers with an emotional insight into the trials of the teenagers who are forced into a life of secrecy and constant fear. They tell of their own journeys, their own experiences. Each character, although of similar circumstances, sees different aspects of the unwinding program as a whole. Connor becomes the unofficial leader of the unwinds, and deals with the political mechanics within the teenage revolutionaries. Lev, with a religious upbringing that advocates being unwound, holds the mindset of society before going on his journey of self-exploration. Risa, a strong, fiery woman, brings the novel to life with her blunt, honest judgments and righteous passion. Each character, along with an omnipotent narrator, effectively reveals each side of the fight for their liberal freedom—the right to life. The novel was an easy, quick read. The writing style is simplistic, but does not fail to bring about the emotions other authors rely on long-winded, sophisticated word to emulate. The book is blunt, straightforward; it delivers its message with raw passion and shocking realism. Unwind delves into the worst of mankind, unveiling the horrors within our society that people never wish to acknowledge or realize. It is a book I would recommend to anyone.

velbez

This book was so interesting to read in that the stories are memories shared by the writer's granmothers. Masha Gessen is a Russian journalist who has been the Russian correspondant to US News and World Report, she took some time from her career to spend with her grand mothers and record their story of living through this time in history.