hatemplusd

Hatem itibaren Coishco District, Peru itibaren Coishco District, Peru

Okuyucu Hatem itibaren Coishco District, Peru

Hatem itibaren Coishco District, Peru

hatemplusd

Sadece Jim Starlin'in yapabileceği büyük destansı kozmik macera. Thanos, temelde onu Tanrı yapan tüm Sonsuzluk Taşlarını topladı. Adam Warlock ve Yenilmezlerin kudreti, onu durdurmak için bir plan yapmak için birlikte çalışır. Zorlu bir hile gibi değil, gerçekten büyük ve destansı hisseden son büyük olay komik hikayelerinden biri. Evren yayılıyor, aynı zamanda birçok ilginç karakter biti var. Her şey çok büyük ve bilimkurgu olsa da, hala daha küçük, iyi yazılmış anlar var. Kaptan Amerika ile bir sahne özellikle havalı ve Starlin Thanos'u üç boyutlu ve ilginç kötü adamlardan birine dönüştürebildi.

hatemplusd

*diz book waz on & popppin 1 of da best bookz i 3v3a r3ad*

hatemplusd

It starts with 'You ask too many questions and you think too much' then gets worse from there. It presumes that the reader believes the Jesus mythology then goes ahead and uses quotes from the bible, in a circular logic, to support the claims of...wait for it...the bible. I went along with the premise of assuming Jesus to be real, but it really didn't help. From one chapter to the next the author fails to keep his arguments coherent. In one chapter God is hidden, then in the next a problematic scipture is explained away by a God that actual visits people - uh, visiting people is the exact opposite of remaining hidden, FYI. In another chapter, God's murderous demands are explained as being moral because, well, god makes life, thus he is justified in taking it ¬¬, uh, ok, but then in the very next chapter when discussing the ethics of hell, it suddenly becomes immoral for god to 'unexist' someone rather than have them suffer eternal damnation. Which is it? Is killing by God OK or not? Fortunately the author is not troubled by such details. Oh yea, speaking of hell; hell isn't full of fire and worms and gnashing of teeth, no no no, that was an allegory you see, hell is just a mental torment of being away from God...as if mental torment for an eternity is somehow better than physical torment? This book is filled with such nonsense. Throughout, the common thread is 'the end justify the means', which is Machiavellian more than divine, IMHO...and of course any troublesome bible passage that is complete abhorrent and debased is explained away by the ever handy 'mistranslation' or better yet, ignored. I feel dumber for having read this book. Needless to say the case was weak. Clearly this is not a book for skeptics, but for lapsed christians seeking reassurance, and this author seeks to deliver a pablum of coddling to bring the stray sheep back to the flock.

hatemplusd

I read this book 5x when I was in JrH/HS and just ran into a copy at Half Price Books for $3 so I'm reading it again :)

hatemplusd

I especially loved this book for the extremely acute and perceptive descriptions of Detroit and its suburbs during the mid-to-late 20th century. But Eugenides can really tell an amazing story, winding across continents and decades, and his protagonist is someone who will stay with you for long after you finish. To me, the best parts of the book were about the grandparents.